The Schein-Joseph International Museum of International Art, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University
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Conspicuous Applications of Advanced Ceramics a special exhibition at The International Museum of Ceramic Art at Alfred
William J. Walker, Jr., Ph.D.
Ceramic Engineer and Guest Curator
June 24 - September 25, 1997
 
Water Boy, 1996 "Thirst" Series carved honeycomb ceramics; Ceralux High Pressure Sodium Lamps containing polycrystalline alumina tubes; American Firebroom components - ceramic flotation log and Nextel mullite ceramic fabric
Water Boy, 1996 "Thirst" Series carved honeycomb ceramics; Ceralux High Pressure Sodium Lamps containing polycrystalline alumina tubes; American Firebroom components - ceramic flotation log and Nextel mullite ceramic fabric
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Water Boy
High pressure sodium lamps, which are most visible as street lights that have a yellowish color, consist of a glass outer bulb which encloses a translucent polycrystalline alumina arc tube. Light is produced by an electric arc passing through combined vapors of mercury and sodium. The thermal and chemical stability of alumina meet the demands required to contain the highly corrosive vapor.

The American Fireboom is a floating containment barrier for oil spills that can withstand the high temperatures of burning crude oil. It is used to contain and burn oil spills at sea, avoiding ecological disasters to shore lines and the sea bottom. The fireboom is composed of a long chain of flotation logs made from a closed-cell ceramic foam, which are wrapped with Nextel
ceramic fabric and stainless steel mesh.

Water Boy "Thirst Series" gift from the artist; Ceralux High Pressure Sodium Lamps gift from Philips Lighting; American Firebroom components on loan from American Marine Inc.
 
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